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Your vote can make me a South by Southwest presenter. Vote & share today!

August 8, 2017 Leave a comment

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You have the power to get my South by Southwest® (SXSW®) panel proposals approved for SxSW 2018. Click on each link below to vote and be sure to share with your networks and friends so they can do the same.

After you click on the link, use the left navigation panel to vote UP (yes!!). Leave a brief comment to make an even greater impact. Yes you can vote for ALL of these sessions.

The SXSW® Conference & Festivals celebrate the convergence of the interactive, film, and music industries. Fostering creative and professional growth alike, SXSW® is the premier destination for discovery.

Use the quick links or see the full session descriptions below. Thank you in advance for your support! ~ @IPProfEvans

|RegisterRight!|Leaving Your Legacy|From Posts to Profits|
|Women in Sports|IP for App Developers|

RegisterRight!

The ABCs of Protecting Your IP

[Vote for RegisterRight! session]

Creating a song, script, app, invention or business is just the beginning of any creative’s journey. Too often that can also be the end of the road. Because when creatives focus solely on the creative process without adequately protecting their intellectual property, they leave their copyright, trademark, and patent rights at risk or forever lost altogether. The rules are complex and confusing. This panel explains the specific steps every creative needs to take to protect their IP rights.

Additional presenters:

 

Leaving Your Legacy

Estate Planning for Creatives

[Vote for Leaving Your Legacy session]

Death isn’t the end of the road for copyright. The term of copyright endures, in most cases, for 70 years after the creator’s death. Creatives must understand probate and trust laws to adequately protect and maximize the value of their creative works after death. This includes understanding the transfer termination right that allows creators to reclaim control of transferred rights and the role of IP fiduciaries. This workshop answers these and related estate planning questions affecting artists

Additional presenter:

  • Shontavia Johnson, Kern Family Chair in Intellectual Property Law, Director of the Intellectual Property Law Center, Professor of Law, Drake University Law School

From Posts to Profits

Leveraging Your Brand

[Vote for From Posts to Profits session]

Developing and sharing content online has become a necessary way for content creators to communicate with their audiences and grow their brands. From posts and photos to videos, creators are oftentimes giving away content for free on social media and blogs. This session will explain how creators can monetize and leverage their content to grow not only an audience, but a lucrative career. It will also explain why content creators must protect their intellectual property in the process.

Additional presenters:

Women in Sports

Money, Power, Respect?

[Vote for Women in Sports session]

Venus. Serena. Famous, accomplished sports figures who represent the strides female athletes have made in recent decades. Still they endure criticism regarding the quality of women’s sports, media coverage of female athletics, pay equity, and femininity in sports. Sadly, they are not exceptional. Women today struggle to earn money, power, and respect across the sports world, from playing fields to boardrooms. This panel explores these persistent challenges and offers creative solutions.

Additional presenters:

Intellectual Property for App Developers

[Vote for IP for App Developers session]

This panel will discuss app development and intellectual property law. The panelists are experts in patent, copyright, and trademark law. Attendees will learn how to identify intellectual property issues that arise in app development. The panelists will share best practices for avoiding intellectual property disputes. Also, attendees will learn how to take initial steps to protect their intellectual property.

Additional presenters:

 

VIDEO: 203 Copyright Transfer Terminations: All Hype or Finally Ripe?

April 3, 2017 Leave a comment

On Thursday, March 23rd I presented a Lunch & Learn at the University of New Hampshire School of Law’s Franklin Pierce Center for Intellectual Property.

I covered 203 copyright transfer termination rights mechanics, the post-2013 response of copyright creators and copyright-industries when the first termination “window” opened for post-1977 transfers, and stakeholder and commentator forecasts about whether the anticipated termination tidal wave of destruction is more academic than real.

Copyright transfer termination permits a copyright creator to reclaim control of his or her copyright several decades after transferring the right. This applies to all copyright transfers no matter what a contract may say about a perpetual transfer. Creators cannot waive this right. But they can forfeit it if they are not careful.

In fact, some creators have already forfeited their rights if they transferred copyright in 1978 and failed to serve notice of termination by 2016. 

I offered some preliminary conclusions on the future of copyright-dependent industries in light of the 203 termination right.

Watch, listen and learn!

Evans places article that explores copyright termination & estate planning with W. Va. Law Review

May 4, 2016 Leave a comment

Statutory Heirs Apparent?: Reclaiming Copyright in the Age of Author-Controlled, Author-Benefiting Transfers, 119 W. Va. Law Rev. __ (2016).

will-3This Article explores the intersection and disconnect between copyright law and estates law when a copyright owner dies before having the opportunity to exercise her termination right of an inter vivos copyright transfer. Specifically, I explore the impact of a statutory heir’s copyright transfer termination right on the original author’s testamentary freedom to the extent the decedent’s nonprobate disposition of assets is contrary to the “statutory will” disposition found in the Copyright Act.

contracts_penAlthough copyright transfers made by will are not subject to a termination right, no such exception is made for an author’s lifetime transfers into vehicles controlled by the author. Examples of such transfers include those made into a performing artist’s loan-out company or a songwriter’s lifetime transfer of musical composition and sound recording copyrights into a self-settled irrevocable trust or charitable foundation.

170px-Copyright_svgThe practical effect is that an heir (defined by the Act as a spouse, child or grandchild) who inherits the right to terminate any lifetime copyright transfer (including those just described), may exercise that right and successfully reclaim copyright ownership against the decedent’s intent to transfer copyright ownership at death to someone or some entity other than that statutorily prescribed heir.

I argue the termination right was intended to protect authors from being saddled for the full copyright term with bad deals made early in their careers when they had little, if any, bargaining power. The right was not intended to prevent authors from advantageous lifetime transfers into vehicles controlled by the author for prudent business, tax and estate planning reasons.

Many scholars, practitioners, and copyright transferees in the entertainment business surmised the likely impact of the first reclamation trigger date of January 1, 2013 under §203 of the 1976 Copyright Act on post-1977 transfer terminations. Some also expressed concern with the apparent distinction between, and treatment of, transfers by will and nonprobate transfers. This article focuses on what has actually transpired since that trigger date.

In addition, the article focuses on what might be done going forward to reconcile the probate and nonprobate disposition of copyrights in a way that best honors an author’s testamentary intent given what we now know from cases starting to make their way through the court system.

Prof. Evans to present paper at #WIPIP2016 Colloquium on impact of copyright transfer terminations on loan-outs & other gratuitous transfers

January 22, 2016 Leave a comment

On February 18-19, 2016 the University of Washington Law School and Center for Advanced Study & Research on Innovation Policy (CASRIP) will host the annual Works-in-Progress Intellectual Property (WIPIP) Colloquium.

intellectual_property_transferThe organizers selected Professor Evans to present her work-in-progress, Reclaiming Copyright in the Age of Celebrity Loan-Outs & Gratuitous Transfers, at this esteemed IP law conference.

Many scholars, practitioners, and copyright transferees in the entertainment business surmised the likely impact of the first reclamation trigger date of January 1, 2013 under §203 of the 1976 Copyright Act on post-1977 transfer terminations. Some also expressed concern with the apparent distinction between, and treatment of, transfers by will and nonprobate transfers.

In this Article, Professor Evans focuses on what has actually transpired since that trigger date. In addition, she considers how to reconcile the probate and nonprobate dispositions of copyright termination interests in a way that best honors an author’s testamentary intent given what we can now glean in fact from the post-1977 termination cases just starting to make their way through the court system.

WIPIP is one of the largest academic conferences for U.S. IP academics fostering robust and productive discussion of intellectual property law and policy scholarship. The Colloquium provides intellectual property scholars with a forum to present their academic works-in-progress and receive early feedback from their colleagues.

That same weekend, CASRIP will also host The Forum will be held on February 18, 2016 at the Hotel Deca. The IV Asia Pacific IP Forum hosted by CASRIP will bring together founding members from UW, UC Berkeley, Waseda University, Hokkaido University, Seoul National University, Renmin University and National Taiwan University, as well as leading Pacific Rim scholars, practitioners, judges and policymakers, to discuss comparative transnational IP law in practice.

More information about Professor Tonya M. Evans

More details about WIPIP 2016

 

Prof. Evans explores copyright transfer terminations & probate law at TAMU Law IP Scholars Roundtable 10/9-10/10

October 9, 2015 Leave a comment
Headshot of Professor Tonya Evans

Credit: Leaping Lion Photography

Associate Professor Tonya M. Evans presents her work-in-progress, Reclaiming Copyright in the Ages of Celebrity Loan-Outs and Other Gratuitous Transfers at the Intellectual Property Scholars Roundtable October 9-10th at Texas A&M University School of Law.

In her article, Professor Evans argues that Congress should resolve an apparently unintended conflict between copyright law and probate law, related to a copyright creator’s testamentary freedom, found in the copyright transfer termination provisions.

Termination & Notice Timeline-FutureofMusic.org

Termination & Notice Timeline-FutureofMusic.org

The article explores a recent Ninth Circuit case, Ray Charles Foundation v. Robinson, 795 F.3d 1109 (9th Cir. 2015). That case presents facts analogous to the problem Professor Evans believes that Congress should remedy; that is, the threat to an artist’s testamentary freedom when statutory heirs assert their copyright termination interests in ways clearly contrary to the decedent author’s wishes.

This inaugural roundtable brings together intellectual property and technology law scholars, providing them with an annual forum for sharing research and peer networking. In addition to the usual work-in-progress presentations, this interdisciplinary roundtable will feature substantial commentary offered by veteran commentators and extended Q&A sessions.

More information about the TAMU Law IP Scholars Roundtable

Evans pens essential guide to literary contracts for writers

August 31, 2015 Leave a comment

contracts-companion-cover_200By thoroughly examining more than a dozen publishing industry contracts, this how-to guide answers the most common questions writers ask about publishing, agency, coauthoring, working-for-hire, and other agreements.

This reference breaks down the complex legalese in each contract and provides a clause-by-clause explanation of their contents. Commentary on negotiation points and the consequences related to the absence or presence of critical verbiage will help those—from the most seasoned author signing with a major publishing firm to an author who aspires to publish or is thinking of working with a collaborator on a project—who seek to demystify the process of signing important agreements operate from a more knowledgeable position.

Published by Legal Write Publications (978-0967457987). Buy now at Amazon.com.

Evans’ Safe Harbor Article One of 2014’s Best, Selected for Thomson Reuters Ent Law Anthology

May 8, 2014 4 comments

WillametteLawRev-CoverMy law review article, Safe Harbor for the Innocent Infringer in the Digital Age, published recently by Willamette Law Review (50 Willamette L. Rev. 1 (2013)),  has been judged one of the best law review articles related to entertainment, publishing and/or the arts published within the last year!

Accordingly, the editor of the 2014 edition of the Entertainment, Publishing and the Arts Handbook selected Safe Harbor for inclusion in the annual Handbook anthology published by Thomson Reuters (West).

[View & DL Safe Harbor for the Innocent Infringer in the Digital Age]

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