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Essential symposium on criminal sentencing reform & the death penalty in PA & beyond

March 23, 2015 Comments off

As the Faculty Advisor of the Widener Law Journal, it gives me great pleasure to announce the following Symposium:

2015 Widener Law Journal Symposium

Death Penalty Reform_e-card_2015_front

Monday, April 20, 2015, 1:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. Widener University School of Law-Harrisburg Administrative Building , Room A180 3737 Vartan Way, Harrisburg, PA 17106

The Widener Law Journal (WLJ) will host its annual symposium on April 20, 2015 from 1:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. on Widener University School of Law’s Harrisburg Campus. WLJ will also live tweet the event @WidenerJournal and hashtag #WLJSymposium. This year’s symposium topic is Halt & Reform?: Death Penalty & Criminal Sentencing Guidelines Reform. The focus at the local and national level will be on the administrative, constitutional and policy considerations in criminal sentencing guidelines, the 8th Amendment and capital punishment. The latter topic is particularly timely and relevant in Pennsylvania given Governor Wolf’s recent decision to halt executions in Pennsylvania and the reaction among District Attorneys throughout the Commonwealth to challenge the decision. The afternoon will begin with Opening Remarks and a presentation by members of the Pennsylvania Sentencing Commission to set the tone for the Symposium. It will be followed by two panel discussions: Panel One-Criminal Justice and Sentencing Reform and Panel Two: Capital Punishment and Related Issues. We have invited members of the academic, public and private spheres to present and attend and promise to have a lively, engaging, and informative discussion that approaches the topic from various points of view. Click here for a current list of Widener Law Journal Symposium panelists and special guests.

4 CLE credits will be offered and registration is now open.

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Widener Law Journal Hosts Groundbreaking Bankruptcy & Beyond Symposium in Harrisburg Apr 14th

April 11, 2014 Leave a comment

PROF NOTE: As faculty advisor to the Widener Law Journal, I am honored to moderate the panel on Financing Municipalities with panelists Christine Sgarlata Chung, Associate Professor, Albany Law School, Randle B. Pollard, Assistant Professor, Indiana University Kelley School of Business and David Unkovic, McNees Wallace & Nurick, LLC.

Bankruptcy and Beyond: Solving the Problem of Municipal Financial Distress

Municipal financial distress is a problem of enormous importance both nationally and in Pennsylvania. Detroit recently filed the largest municipal bankruptcy case in history, 21 cities in Pennsylvania are in Act 47, the Municipalities Financial Recovery Act program, and Harrisburg is on its way to recovery after operating in receivership for over two years.
This symposium, presented on Monday April 14, 2014 by the Widener Law Journal of Widener University School of Law’s Harrisburg, Pennsylvania Campus, will explore the causes of municipal distress and approaches to alleviating the problem. Reducing existing debt is not enough; policymakers must think creatively about municipal structure, finance, and expenditures. The invited speakers include experts in state and local government law, municipal finance and tax issues, public pensions, and Chapter 9 bankruptcy.
The symposium (which offers six CLE credits and valuable networking opportunities) will provide a unique opportunity for nationally recognized scholars in a variety of areas related to municipal financial distress to exchange ideas with professionals involved in Harrisburg’s recovery.

Click Here to Register and for More Information

Distinguished speakers and panelists

DISTINGUISHED ADDRESS
General William Lynch Former Receiver for the City of Harrisburg
SPEAKERS:
Michelle Wilde Anderson University of California, Berkeley School of Law
Hon. Thomas Bennett U.S. Bankruptcy Court, Northern District of Alabama
Christine Sgarlata Chung Albany Law School
Hon. Mary D. France U.S. Bankruptcy Court, Middle District of Pennsylvania
Jarad Handelman First Executive Deputy General Counsel to Governor Tom Corbett
Mark Kaufman McKenna Long & Aldridge LLP
Juliet M. Moringiello Widener University School of Law
Guy S. Neal Sidley Austin LLP
Matthew Parlow Marquette University School of Law
Randle Pollard Indiana University Kelley School of Business
Scott Pryor Regent University School of Law
Frank H. Shafroth George Mason University
David A. Skeel University of Pennsylvania School of Law
David Thornburgh University of Pennsylvania Fels Institute of Government
David Unkovic McNees Wallace & Nurick LLC

Evans to Present at Third Annual IP Roundtable at Columbus School of Law

October 19, 2011 Leave a comment

On November 18, 2011, The Catholic University of America, Columbus School of Law will host the Third Annual Intellectual Property Roundtable.  The Roundtable was formed to promote both discussion of a range of issues in intellectual property and networking.  The Roundtable is an annual opportunity for academics to learn about the ongoing research of fellow scholars.

Title:  Intellectual Property Roundtable
Date:   November 18, 2011
Time:   12:30 pm – 3:00 pm
Info: Catholic University of America, Columbus School of Law

Evans, who teaches Copyright & Trademark, intellectual property seminars, and a year-long first-year Property course, will present her current work-in-progress titled Reverse Engineering Copyright: Sampling Patent to Remix Copyright. The paper asserts that copyright reform initiatives should “sample” (that is, borrow from) patent policies to “remix” (that is, inform and reform) copyright jurisprudence. Specifically, this article explores the role that “reverse engineering” and other patent policies have played in protecting the “space” second-generation inventors enjoy to build upon and around existing inventions that justify the patent monopoly. Professor Evans asserts that this approach both empowers creators to access existing works for certain purposes and at the same time still protects rights holders in a way that honors the IP Clause’s directive to secure certain exclusive rights. Such an approach is particularly vital in collaborative and cumulative creative genres like music as well as other performance art forms born traditionally out of collaboration and cumulative creative effort. Accordingly, patent policy should be “sampled” to remix copyright.

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