Next stop, SXSW and SXSW EDU 2020 … but only if you VOTE UP my Panel Proposals!

You have the power to get my South by Southwest® (SXSW®) panel proposals approved for SXSW 2020 and SXSW EDU 2020. Please, please click on each of the links below to vote, AND be sure to share with your networks so they can do the same. Voting ends on August 23rd.

HOW TO VOTE: Click “VOTE UP” on the left side of the screen once you click the links below. The “VOTE UP” box will turn yellow as a confirmation of your vote. If you don’t already have a SXSW account, you’ll have to create one. 

QUICK LINKS*

  1. Going Global: World Wide Education (SXSW EDU)
  2. Elect Tech 2020 (SXSW)
  3. I’m a Business, Man: How to “Expertize” Yourself (SXSW EDU)
  4. Tweeting While Black: You in Danger, Girl… (SXSW)
  5. Who Will Lead Us? (SXSW)
  6. Who Will Lead Us? (SXSW EDU)

*FYI: I am part of six SXSW/SXSW EDU pitches. I’d certainly appreciate you voting for all six. But if your long on enthusiasm but short on time, please at least vote for #1 and #2! Thank you!


GOING GLOBAL: WORLD WIDE EDUCATION

Delivery of education and related services is being disrupted and transformed. Educators who want to remain relevant in the future must make the shift now.

This SXSW EDU panel of experts will explore web-based classrooms, as well as blockchain other technologies poised to deliver education and credential verification more efficiently, effectively and less expensively. and its impact on the future education and the students we educate. The future is now.

Panelists:

[VOTE]


ELECT TECH 2020

Today’s political climate inextricably links the tech industry to politics, despite the industry’s resistance to threats of hacking, foreign influence, and #fakenews. Disruptive technologies like AR, VR, machine learning, and blockchain can address these threats. The presidential hopeful who best understands and leverages these tools will be the last candidate standing, if history is any indicator.

This SXSW panel of experts explores the phenomenon of candidates winning unwinnable presidential elections by using disruptive technology. It also identifies strategies that 2020 candidates can adopt to leverage disruptive technology. This includes both campaign integration and proposed policies, particularly the regulation of tech companies and “corpocurrencies” like Facebook’s Libra.

Panelists:

[VOTE UP]


I’M A BUSINESS, MAN: HOW TO “EXPERTIZE” YOURSELF

Many teachers and academics have cultivated a deep base of knowledge in the fields that they teach and/or research but may not consider themselves “experts.” If Malcolm Gladwell is right that it takes 10,000 hours to achieve mastery in any given field, most people are experts in something once they’ve put in the time.

This SXSW EDU panel will outline how teachers and academics can use their knowledge to become well-known experts, with opportunities for speaking, consulting, and book publishing.

Panelists:

[VOTE UP]


TWEETING WHILE BLACK: YOU IN DANGER, GIRL …

Twitter represents a frenetic dichotomy for black women. On one hand, Twitter is a place to converse publicly and build community. The success of Black Twitter is but one example of how black women thrive in the Twitterverse. On the other hand, Twitter can be dangerous for black women. A 2018 Amnesty International study found that black women are Twitter’s most targeted group. It showed that black women are 84% more likely than white women to receive abusive tweets. It also labeled 1 in 10 tweets about Black women as abusive or problematic, with those tweets being sent every 30 seconds.

This SXSW panel will address this Twitter dichotomy. From the research, to having a large following, to going viral, this diverse group of panelists will explore the present and future of black women on Twitter.

Panelists:

[VOTE UP]


Who Will Lead Us?

In a digital society, the very foundation of democracy relies on citizens and institutions to understand the digital. Schools, colleges, companies, and governments all play a critical role in developing a common language about digital media. Evidence suggests that despite the rapid diffusion and adoption of digital technologies, public discourse has not figured out how to train, educate and model meaningful discussion about the digital. In this panel, a group of scholar-practitioner-activists will lead the audience on a journey of agenda setting. What would a public education campaign about digital media and economies look like? And, what institutions do we need to build for ethical leadership of digital media discourses that affect everyone’s lives?

Panelists:

[VOTE UP]


Who Will Lead Us?

In today’s world, the very foundation of democracy relies on citizens and institutions to understand the digital. Schools, colleges, companies and governments play a critical role in developing common language about digital media. The stakes are high. We can’t govern tech companies if we don’t have a public language to talk about tech and values.

In this SXSW EDU panel, a group of scholar-activists will lead you on a journey of agenda setting. How do we talk about the stakes of a technological society?

Panelists:

[VOTE UP]

Dean Evans delivers Blockchain for Law Professors Webinar for AALS Summer Series

AALS-webinar-screencapture

Tonya-SXSW-49190This session, Educating Law Professors about Blockchain, is intended to introduce you to the technology and terminology and to highlight some prominent and promising use cases in education, generally, and legal education in particular. And also, at a more fundamental level, to encourage you to consider the vital and essential role of technology in the classroom and curricula at every level of education.

There are two basic ways that we, as educators, must be prepared for this latest technological wave of innovation. The first is to educate ourselves so that we can empower our students. The second is to understand how the technology is poised to disrupt, disintermediate and transform the education industry in some really exciting ways.

About the AALS Webinar: What Professors Need to Know About Blockchain

On the road again … next stop, Lutie Lytle Workshop & Writing Retreat @ Dedman SMU Law

I’m honored to return to the annual Lutie Lytle Black Women Faculty Workshop & Writing Retreat, held this year at the SMU Dedman School of Law (Dallas, TX). Lytle was the first African-American female law professor in the U.S.

I am participating in two exciting panels:

  • Developing Your Brand and a “Side Hustle”
  • Blockchain Technology: Smart Contracts, Wallets, Mining and Cryptocurrencies

I will also do an incubator presentation of my latest WIP, Cryptokitties, Cryptography & Copyright. This paper will be published in the BYU Copyright and Trademark Symposium Issue of the American Intellectual Property Law Association Quarterly Journal and also presented more formally at:

[Full Presentation Schedule | About Professor Evans]

Professor Evans Moderates Cutting-Edge Panel on Innovation in Teaching & Practice

Professor Tonya Evans (Widener University School of Law – Harrisburg, PA) will serve as panel moderator of the Technological Innovation in Practice and Education at the 2012 Association of American Law Schools annual meeting. This panel will expose the audience to the technological realities of modern practice, and generate discussion about how the academy might respond in our teaching and scholarship to address advances in technology.

The discussion will include an update by Professor Andrew Perelmen about the ABA Commission on Ethics 20/20’s work on lawyer regulation and technology, as well as insights from Stephanie Kimbro, a legal practitioner who conducts her entire law practice virtually and Professor Paula Schaefer who has designed an innovative e-discovery course.

More information about the panelists >> Ms. Stephanie Kimbro, Kimbro Legal Services, Andrew M. Perlman, Suffolk University Law School and Paula Schaefer, University of Tennessee College of Law.

Why Academic Plagiarism is On The Rise

© 2011 Professor Tonya M. Evans

November 12, 2011

The folks at Plagiarism Today published an insightful article on the impact of 21st century technologies and the rise of academic plagiarism. The easy answer of ‘kids these days’ doesn’t account for the exponential rise in the last 25 years, it seems. Studies show attitudes about cheating haven’t changed all that much over the years. The bottom line is it’s just easier to plagiarise in a “search engine-copy-and-paste-wikipedia” world. Thankfully, it’s also easier to detect with the right tools.

What’s the best way to avoid plagiarism altogether? Instilling integrity. A little goes a long way and serves as one of the essential building blocks of a successful, competent and respected lawyer; one that represents him or herself, the client and the profession exceedingly well. Just because.

Read Plagiarism Today’s Article on Why Plagiarism is on the rise

“Just Fit” review of the top ten plagiarism detection tools [paid and free]

Coping with Stress in Law School … You are not alone!

The following is an excellent article on coping with the stress of law school posted at Alex Ruskell’s Academic Support Blog. In the article he helps students 1) identify where the stress is coming from 2) identify the symptoms of stress and 3) provides tools to cope and warns of things you should avoid. The most important point is that you are not alone and there is help out there.

Click here to read the article: http://law.rwu.edu/blog/dealing-law-school-stress