Next stop, SXSW and SXSW EDU 2020 … but only if you VOTE UP my Panel Proposals!

You have the power to get my South by Southwest® (SXSW®) panel proposals approved for SXSW 2020 and SXSW EDU 2020. Please, please click on each of the links below to vote, AND be sure to share with your networks so they can do the same. Voting ends on August 23rd.

HOW TO VOTE: Click “VOTE UP” on the left side of the screen once you click the links below. The “VOTE UP” box will turn yellow as a confirmation of your vote. If you don’t already have a SXSW account, you’ll have to create one. 

QUICK LINKS*

  1. Going Global: World Wide Education (SXSW EDU)
  2. Elect Tech 2020 (SXSW)
  3. I’m a Business, Man: How to “Expertize” Yourself (SXSW EDU)
  4. Tweeting While Black: You in Danger, Girl… (SXSW)
  5. Who Will Lead Us? (SXSW)
  6. Who Will Lead Us? (SXSW EDU)

*FYI: I am part of six SXSW/SXSW EDU pitches. I’d certainly appreciate you voting for all six. But if your long on enthusiasm but short on time, please at least vote for #1 and #2! Thank you!


GOING GLOBAL: WORLD WIDE EDUCATION

Delivery of education and related services is being disrupted and transformed. Educators who want to remain relevant in the future must make the shift now.

This SXSW EDU panel of experts will explore web-based classrooms, as well as blockchain other technologies poised to deliver education and credential verification more efficiently, effectively and less expensively. and its impact on the future education and the students we educate. The future is now.

Panelists:

[VOTE]


ELECT TECH 2020

Today’s political climate inextricably links the tech industry to politics, despite the industry’s resistance to threats of hacking, foreign influence, and #fakenews. Disruptive technologies like AR, VR, machine learning, and blockchain can address these threats. The presidential hopeful who best understands and leverages these tools will be the last candidate standing, if history is any indicator.

This SXSW panel of experts explores the phenomenon of candidates winning unwinnable presidential elections by using disruptive technology. It also identifies strategies that 2020 candidates can adopt to leverage disruptive technology. This includes both campaign integration and proposed policies, particularly the regulation of tech companies and “corpocurrencies” like Facebook’s Libra.

Panelists:

[VOTE UP]


I’M A BUSINESS, MAN: HOW TO “EXPERTIZE” YOURSELF

Many teachers and academics have cultivated a deep base of knowledge in the fields that they teach and/or research but may not consider themselves “experts.” If Malcolm Gladwell is right that it takes 10,000 hours to achieve mastery in any given field, most people are experts in something once they’ve put in the time.

This SXSW EDU panel will outline how teachers and academics can use their knowledge to become well-known experts, with opportunities for speaking, consulting, and book publishing.

Panelists:

[VOTE UP]


TWEETING WHILE BLACK: YOU IN DANGER, GIRL …

Twitter represents a frenetic dichotomy for black women. On one hand, Twitter is a place to converse publicly and build community. The success of Black Twitter is but one example of how black women thrive in the Twitterverse. On the other hand, Twitter can be dangerous for black women. A 2018 Amnesty International study found that black women are Twitter’s most targeted group. It showed that black women are 84% more likely than white women to receive abusive tweets. It also labeled 1 in 10 tweets about Black women as abusive or problematic, with those tweets being sent every 30 seconds.

This SXSW panel will address this Twitter dichotomy. From the research, to having a large following, to going viral, this diverse group of panelists will explore the present and future of black women on Twitter.

Panelists:

[VOTE UP]


Who Will Lead Us?

In a digital society, the very foundation of democracy relies on citizens and institutions to understand the digital. Schools, colleges, companies, and governments all play a critical role in developing a common language about digital media. Evidence suggests that despite the rapid diffusion and adoption of digital technologies, public discourse has not figured out how to train, educate and model meaningful discussion about the digital. In this panel, a group of scholar-practitioner-activists will lead the audience on a journey of agenda setting. What would a public education campaign about digital media and economies look like? And, what institutions do we need to build for ethical leadership of digital media discourses that affect everyone’s lives?

Panelists:

[VOTE UP]


Who Will Lead Us?

In today’s world, the very foundation of democracy relies on citizens and institutions to understand the digital. Schools, colleges, companies and governments play a critical role in developing common language about digital media. The stakes are high. We can’t govern tech companies if we don’t have a public language to talk about tech and values.

In this SXSW EDU panel, a group of scholar-activists will lead you on a journey of agenda setting. How do we talk about the stakes of a technological society?

Panelists:

[VOTE UP]

Professor Evans presents @ Women in Blockchain & GA-Boston Event Tues 2/5

blockchain-image

The last decade has seen blockchain technology grow from an anarchic financial experiment to a global engine for organizational and societal change.

Join Women in Blockchain and General Assembly for a panel discussion on the history and future of blockchain.

We will chart the path from pre-Bitcoin computer science breakthroughs, to Bitcoin and the rise of alternative currencies, through Ethereum and the rise of smart contracts, arriving at the present day explosion of tokens, enterprise networks, and regulations governing blockchain and cryptocurrencies.

Schedule:

  • 6:30 – 6:45 pm: Networking
  • 6:45 – 8:00 pm: Introductions and Panel Discussion
  • 8:00 – 8:30 pm: Q&A and Networking

Meet the Panelists:

  • Jagathi Gururajan, Technology Executive, High Growth Global Companies
  • Tonya M. Evans, Chair, IP & Technology Online Programs, University of New Hampshire
  • Lindsay Nuon, Founder, Women of Color in Blockchain

To secure your spot to this event, please register here: https://ga.co/womeninblockchain

*In Partnership with General Assembly*

General Assembly is a pioneer in education and career transformation, specializing in today’s most in-demand skills. The leading source for training, staffing, and career transitions, we foster a flourishing community of professionals pursuing careers they love. Learn more at https://ga.co.

Twitter: @GA_Boston / Instagram: @ga.boston

Blockchain, Cryptocurrency & Law: an online key to unlocking the future of business, tech & law

Credit: WIPO

When I fell down the proverbial rabbit hole of the cryptocurrency and blockchain ecosystem, I had no idea I’d turn into part-expert, part-evangelist. But here I am. And because you found your way to this post, here you are too! So we are in great company.

Blockchain Education @ UNH Law

After spending the better part of every waking hour fully immersed in the space by writing, speaking and crafting a curriculum and program, we are starting to enjoy the fruits of our labor here at UNH Law in launching a host of innovative course offerings in partnership with iLaw Ventures (a BARBRI company).

Education about blockchain, cryptocurrencies and other crypto assets, is essential. This is especially true for entrepreneurs, law students, lawyers and business professionals, as the blockchain community continues to develop the infrastructure of Web 3.0.

Honored to be a part of the #blockchainedu build

Coindesk published a substantive article, written by Leigh Cuen, to highlight exclusive details about the UNH Law online certificate program. Cuen’s article also explored the state and, more importantly the future, of blockchain education, in general. Program details are noted below. But here is an excerpt from the article:

It’s not a bear market for everyone.

“A crypto winter for the price is a crypto summer for attorneys,” said Jason Civalleri, adjunct professor at the University of New Hampshire Law School. “As the price sinks, you have a lot of demand for legal services.”

That’s why UNH Law is rushing to offer a new certificate program in blockchain and cryptocurrency. As exclusively told to CoinDesk, over 100 students have expressed interest in the program, which will feature of slew of industry players as guest lecturers – including Hester Peirce of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, Ethereum Foundation researcher Vlad Zamfir and MyCrypto CEO Taylor Monahan.

Read the full article: Lawyers Rush In: New UNH Blockchain Program Nabs Big-Name Speakers

About the BC&L Certificate Program

Continue reading “Blockchain, Cryptocurrency & Law: an online key to unlocking the future of business, tech & law”

Blockchain, Crypto & Smart Contracts: What they are & what they mean for IP

© 2018 Tonya M. Evans

Attribution-NoDerivs
CC BY-ND

Recently, I delivered two presentations in Bangkok, Thailand about the intellectual property implications of blockchain technology. The first was an internal preso for the prominent Southeast Asian law firm of Tilleke & Gibbins, and the second was for the Licensing Executives Society-Thailand Conference.

In each preso, I engaged attendees (live and via video conference) in a macro-level exploration of blockchain technology, cryptocurrencies, and smart contracts to clarify what this relatively new disruptive, empowering ecosystem is, what it means for our collective future as attorneys, corporate leaders, startup founders and entrepreneurs, and its implications in intellectual property law.

Recently, Darts-IP.com published an article I wrote titled IP + Blockchain: A Primer based on some of the information I shared in Bangkok.

I could spend all day every day falling down the proverbial rabbit hole of information about blockchain. There is literally breaking blockchain and cryptocurrency news every minute, if Coindesk’s website and twitter feed are any indication. Each bit and byte of information leads to more information (and misinformation), FUD (fear, uncertainty, doubt), FOMO (fear of missing out), and speculation about all of the potential pitfalls and opportunities in this new technology frontier. So it’s difficult for most people to figure out where to begin. If this describes you, you’re not alone and you’ve come to the right place! Read on.

You probably have questions (or you wouldn’t be reading this post). Lots of them. The first may very well be where to begin to get a handle on the power and promise of blockchain. Everyone should have some baseline understanding. But lawyers, in particular, must achieve basic technological competence in this space to be well positioned to help clients solve problems. Given my background and expertise, I am particularly interested in the intellectual property issues triggered by blockchain’s rise in mainstream adoption as research & development use cases transition into full implementation and refinement.

In future posts, I will share trends and current events in the blockchain ecosystem that raise copyright, patent, and trademark issues. Follow me on Twitter @IPProfEvans for breaking IP-related blockchain and crypto news. Below are some blockchain basics that I cover more substantively in IP + Blockchain: A Primer and some additional resources about blockchain, crypto, and smart contracts.

So … what is Blockchain? [Updated excerpt from IP + Blockchain: A Primer Continue reading “Blockchain, Crypto & Smart Contracts: What they are & what they mean for IP”

Evans chapter on copyright appears in ‘Hip Hop and The Law’ anthology pub’d by Carolina Academic Press

I am excited to announce the official publication of the anthology, Hip Hop & the Law, edited by the late Pamela Bridgewater (formerly a professor at American University School of Law), andré douglas pond cummings (Vice Dean and Professor of Law at Indiana Tech Law School), and Donald F. Tibbs (Associate Professor at the Drexel University School of Law).

I am honored that my contribution,  Sampling, Looping and Mashing … Oh My! How Hip Hop Music is Scratching More Than the Surface of Copyright Law“, appears in this formidable collection of essential reflections by many of today’s leading critical thinkers. From professors, to practitioners, to creatives, Hip Hop and the Law curates a host of diverse voices to analyze and assess the interdisciplinary intersection of American jurisprudence and hip hop music and culture.

bridgewater coverWhat is important to understanding American law? What is important to understanding hip hop? Wide swaths of renowned academics, practitioners, commentators, and performance artists have answered these two questions independently. And although understanding both depends upon the same intellectual enterprise, textual analysis of narrative storytelling, somehow their intersection has escaped critical reflection.

Hip Hop and the Law merges the two cultural giants of law and rap music and demonstrates their relationship at the convergence of Legal Consciousness, Politics, Hip Hop Studies, and American Law.

No matter what your role or level of experience with law or hip hop, this book is a sound resource for learning, discussing, and teaching the nuances of their relationship. Topics include Critical Race Theory, Crime and Justice, Mass Incarceration, Gender, and American Law: including Corporate Law, Intellectual Property, Constitutional Law, and Real Property Law.

About Hip Hop & the Law published by Carolina Academic Press

‘Dumb Starbucks’ parody shuts down but debate over trademark law & parody continues

By Professor Tonya M. Evans

dumbstarbucks-cupsOn February 9th, The Huff Post and other media outlets reported the grand opening of a store in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles, “Dumb Starbucks”. The clever prankish parody even caught the attention of Forbes:

‘Although it looks like Starbucks, smells like Starbucks and even acts like Starbucks (the super-friendly baristas asking for your name were hired off Craigslist), the whole thing is an elaborate goof on Starbucks culture. A list of Frequently Asked Questions posted on premises compared the place to Weird Al Yankovic’s homage to Michael Jackson’s “Beat It.” Dumb Starbucks, you see, is the “Eat It” of $6 coffee drinks.’ Source: Forbes.com

Amazingly, people stood in line for hours for the Dumb Starbucks java, which reportedly was whatever the local grocery store had on hand for the few days Dumb Starbucks remained open. The locals and media alike seemed to get a big kick out of the entire thing. Starbucks execs? Um, not so much. The Dumb Starbucks mastermind, Comedy Central comedian Nathan Fielder from Nathan for You, explained the method to his parodic madness and the Starbucks response to Jimmy Kimmel recently:

The store shutdown for reasons completely unrelated to the trademark vs. parody debate. It seems that Fielder not only caught the attention of the coffee giant, Starbucks, but also the local health department. The Health Department cited code violations for selling coffee without a permit. And there is no word on whether Fielder will attempt to secure the necessary permissions to re-open. But what is sure to re-open and remain so is the debate on whether the First Amendment and parody trumps trademark law. Continue reading “‘Dumb Starbucks’ parody shuts down but debate over trademark law & parody continues”