The theme of 2018? On a mission, on a roll, on a plane!

On a mission, on a roll, on a plane!

[Credit: Franklin Pierce IP News, Nov 2018]

I know it’s not over yet, but 2018 has already been one filled with amazing opportunities, experiences and accomplishments for me. I joined the phenomenal faculty at the University of New Hampshire School of Law (formerly Franklin Pierce Law Center) in the fall of 2017. Since that time it has been planes, trains, and automobiles.

It feels like I created my own “Where in the world is Professor Evans” game as I traveled the world to share my experiences and expertise about the intersections of intellectual property and technology, with a decided focus on blockchain and IP. Reminds me a lot of my life before law school when I traveled the world as a professional tennis player. So I guess all of my experiences have prepared me for this moment in time.

IP Advisory

I was thrilled to be one of the faculty members featured in this month’s Franklin Pierce IP News,  which highlights some of the impressive accomplishments of UNH Law faculty. My highlight focused on a recent nomination by Judge Patricia Elaine Campbell-Smith, and appointment by Chief Judge Margaret M. Sweeney, to the IP Committee of the Advisory Council to the US Court of Federal Claims.

Blockchain Worldwide

Continue reading “The theme of 2018? On a mission, on a roll, on a plane!”

IP + Blockchain = Geneva!

tme-wipo-1
Credit: WIPO

|Learn more about the UNH Law Blockchain, Cryptocurrency & Law Online Certificate|

My trip to Geneva has been marvelous. What a beautiful city with wonderful people here in the epicenter of global initiatives for diplomacy and business. I am fortunate to have visited here during the General Assemblies because there is so much going and so many thought-leaders from around the world in the city currently. Makes for rich opportunities to connect.

Yesterday, I participated in an invitation-only. roundtable discussion, hosted by the International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development (ICTSD), on the issue of disruptive technologies and trade for sustainable development. I shared remarks about the impact of blockchain technology on IP and international trade. This was a wonderful next step after my remarks about international dispute resolution at the Blockchain Central conference held during the United Nations General Assembly in New York last week.

Today, I present at World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) Lunchtime Learning for over 150 WIPO lawyers and staff. I will give an overview of blockchain’s distributed ledger technology, cryptocurrencies and smart contracts. And then take a closer look at some of the copyright, patent and trademark issues and implications of blockchain.

Not many lawyers are actively practicing in this space, although the numbers are growing. It is still very early, even though the Bitcoin blockchain was first released in 2009. But there is a lot of new technology and use cases of interest to clients, organizations and policymakers. So lawyers need to be out ahead of these innovations and in a position to advise clients about how their businesses are going to be impacted. And how their businesses or governments might leverage the technology, if appropriate.

Lawyers do not necessarily need a technological background to have a robust practice in this space or achieve a depth of knowledge. I do not have a technological background, I’m just a (very cool and creative) nerd and life-long learner with a father who’s a doctor and a mother who’s a patent attorney. But for lawyers having some computer science or STEM background, or who commit to unpacking and truly understanding this technology, those lawyers will surely enrich their area of subject matter expertise and increase the value-add to servicing clients and, perhaps, using this technology to solve the world’s biggest problems.

Clients are either in an industry that will be disrupted or want to invest in those technologies or have to deal with their own customers’ questions about Blockchain, cryptocurrency, smart contracts. There is a hunger for information in order to, among other things, honor the 2030 SDG 9 regarding innovation and to figure out what this means for intellectual property now and in the future. And that’s where we as lawyers supply added value. That’s where we problem solve and, if we’re successful, where play a vital role in transforming the world.

 

Happy World Intellectual Property Day!

On April 26 every year, we celebrate World Intellectual Property Day in order to promote discussion of the role of intellectual property (IP) in encouraging innovation and creativity.

World IP Day is a wonderful way to acknowledge and celebrate the tremendous contribution that the creative industries make to our cultural heritage and development, from large-scale Hollywood productions to iconic works of visual art by individual creators.  This year’s theme of Movies- A Global Passion, allows us to recognize the many screen writers, directors, producers, performers and behind the scenes technicians, who make the films we enjoy so magical.

– Karyn Temple Claggett, Associate Register of Copyrights and Director of Policy and International Affairs, United States Copyright Office, Library of Congress

Visit the World Intellectual Property Organization for more information

African Traditional Knowledge And Folklore Given IP Protection Despite Warning Of TK Commodification

September 12, 2010

Post by: Professor Tonya M. Evans http://www.proftonyaevans.com

Intellectual Property Watch reports that at the African Regional Intellectual Property Organization (ARIPO) diplomatic conference on 9-10 August in Swakopmund, Namibia, the protocol on the Protection of Traditional Knowledge and Expressions of Folklore was signed by nine states. The World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) applauded the effort. However, the move is not without controversy. IP Watch notes that “a United Nations report launched in January warned against the application of western legal and economic principles to collectively owned knowledge in traditional communities.” Click on the link for more information.

African Traditional Knowledge And Folklore Given IP Protection Despite Warning Of TK Commodification.